High index lenses worth it

High index lenses are made of a plastic material which bends light more than standard lenses and can therefore be made thinner and lighter allowing for more   17 Jan 2018 For the same index, the higher the prescription, the thicker the lens is. Pupillary Distance. Pupillary distance is the distance between two pupil  27 Nov 2016 Digital lenses are available in single-vision, high-index and progressive (no-line bi-focal) lenses, so virtually anyone who wears eyeglasses is 

These high index lenses cost between $185 for clear single vision and $245 for the same, with coatings. They do not come tinted or with lens types other than progressive. High Index Glass 1.90. These are the absolute thinnest high index lenses, though the glass makes them heavier than plastic. These high index lenses cost between $285 for clear single vision and $345 for the same, with coatings. From progressive lenses to 1.74 high index lenses, the sheer amount of choices in itself requires sometimes significant research. Once you conduct this research, you tend to hone in on the alternative that best suits your needs at a given time. The highest index single-vision lens we offer is the 1.74 high-index polymer lens. It’s for nearsighted (-) single-vision prescriptions only. It provides a thinner lens for SPHs of -8.25 to -10.00 or lower and covers CYLs of +/- 4.00 or lower. High-index lenses ($150 for single vision, $350 for progressives) are thinner and lighter than CR-39 or polycarbonate lenses, and they will work for even the strongest prescriptions. High-definition lenses ($310 for progressive HD lenses) offer sharper vision and better peripheral vision than standard technology. zenni recommends a high-index for my lenses which cost $20 (assuming i am just getting that the total is $45) There are several add-ons on Zenni's store like UV-protection, Anti-Reflective Coating, etc. I will be going with high index (1.67 or possibly 1.74). I had a bad experience previously with high index giving me a headache (I think it was super high index at 1.74), and the person at the optometrist's office suggested digital lenses to address that issue, specifically the Shamir Autograph III-SV lens.

Therefore if you have two lenses with the same power, the lens material that has a higher index of refraction will always be thinner. Standard plastic lenses have an index of refraction of 1.50, and glass lenses have an index of refraction of 1.52. Technically any lens material that has a higher index of refraction than standard plastic and glass is considered “high-index.” RELATED: Best Anti-Fog For Your Prescription Lenses. Polycarbonate Lenses

When Your Prescription is “High Enough” to Consider High Index Lenses High index lenses are some of the highest quality lenses you can order. They are appropriate for most prescriptions, depending on what you want out of your lenses, but there are some prescriptions that simply don’t warrant high index. Thinner, lighter and more expensive than mid-high index or hard resin lenses, high index lenses are a good choice for every day use. High Index Lenses - 1.67 High Index. High index lenses with 1.67 high index are good for people with prescriptions over +/-6.00 sphere, because they are thinner and lighter. The 1.61 high-index polymer single-vision lens provides a thinner lens for stronger prescriptions than mid- and standard-index optical lenses do. It is suitable for SPHs of -6.00/+3.00 or lower and, like all the others except for the 1.50 standard-index lens, CYLs that go up to +/- 6.00. These high index lenses cost between $185 for clear single vision and $245 for the same, with coatings. They do not come tinted or with lens types other than progressive. High Index Glass 1.90. These are the absolute thinnest high index lenses, though the glass makes them heavier than plastic. These high index lenses cost between $285 for clear single vision and $345 for the same, with coatings. From progressive lenses to 1.74 high index lenses, the sheer amount of choices in itself requires sometimes significant research. Once you conduct this research, you tend to hone in on the alternative that best suits your needs at a given time. The highest index single-vision lens we offer is the 1.74 high-index polymer lens. It’s for nearsighted (-) single-vision prescriptions only. It provides a thinner lens for SPHs of -8.25 to -10.00 or lower and covers CYLs of +/- 4.00 or lower. High-index lenses ($150 for single vision, $350 for progressives) are thinner and lighter than CR-39 or polycarbonate lenses, and they will work for even the strongest prescriptions. High-definition lenses ($310 for progressive HD lenses) offer sharper vision and better peripheral vision than standard technology.

Lighter. Thinner edges require less lens material, which reduces the overall weight of the lenses. Lenses made of high-index plastic are lighter than the same  

High index lenses are made of a plastic material which bends light more than standard lenses and can therefore be made thinner and lighter allowing for more   17 Jan 2018 For the same index, the higher the prescription, the thicker the lens is. Pupillary Distance. Pupillary distance is the distance between two pupil  27 Nov 2016 Digital lenses are available in single-vision, high-index and progressive (no-line bi-focal) lenses, so virtually anyone who wears eyeglasses is  When 1.67 High Index Lenses Make Little Difference If CR-39 lenses for your prescription level aren’t excessively thick or heavy, then don’t get 1.67 high index lenses. That is, the differences in lens thickness and weight are minimal.

When 1.67 High Index Lenses Make Little Difference If CR-39 lenses for your prescription level aren’t excessively thick or heavy, then don’t get 1.67 high index lenses. That is, the differences in lens thickness and weight are minimal.

The 1.61 high-index polymer single-vision lens provides a thinner lens for stronger prescriptions than mid- and standard-index optical lenses do. It is suitable for SPHs of -6.00/+3.00 or lower and, like all the others except for the 1.50 standard-index lens, CYLs that go up to +/- 6.00. These high index lenses cost between $185 for clear single vision and $245 for the same, with coatings. They do not come tinted or with lens types other than progressive. High Index Glass 1.90. These are the absolute thinnest high index lenses, though the glass makes them heavier than plastic. These high index lenses cost between $285 for clear single vision and $345 for the same, with coatings. From progressive lenses to 1.74 high index lenses, the sheer amount of choices in itself requires sometimes significant research. Once you conduct this research, you tend to hone in on the alternative that best suits your needs at a given time.

Eyeglass lenses all have a definite "index", which ranges from 1.56 to 1.74. For strong prescription, the higher the index, the thinner the lens; for weak prescriptions 

High-index lenses ($150 for single vision, $350 for progressives) are thinner and lighter than CR-39 or polycarbonate lenses, and they will work for even the strongest prescriptions. High-definition lenses ($310 for progressive HD lenses) offer sharper vision and better peripheral vision than standard technology. zenni recommends a high-index for my lenses which cost $20 (assuming i am just getting that the total is $45) There are several add-ons on Zenni's store like UV-protection, Anti-Reflective Coating, etc. I will be going with high index (1.67 or possibly 1.74). I had a bad experience previously with high index giving me a headache (I think it was super high index at 1.74), and the person at the optometrist's office suggested digital lenses to address that issue, specifically the Shamir Autograph III-SV lens. High index lenses are thinner, more powerful lenses. They're lightweight and stylish, but are mostly reserved for those with higher vision correction needs. While most prescriptions are compatible with more than one specific index, it's up to you to decide which one fits your personal needs! High Index 1.74 lenses are the thinnest, flattest, and most cosmetically appealing lens ever developed. These ultra thin lenses are nearly 50% thinner than plastic and 5% thinner than 1.67 high index lenses, offering you the ultimate in technology and cosmetics. The thinner lens is much more flattering, reducing the distortion that high prescriptions cause when made with lower quality lenses. Hi-index 1.74 lenses are perfect for:

High-index lenses ($150 for single vision, $350 for progressives) are thinner and lighter than CR-39 or polycarbonate lenses, and they will work for even the strongest prescriptions. High-definition lenses ($310 for progressive HD lenses) offer sharper vision and better peripheral vision than standard technology. zenni recommends a high-index for my lenses which cost $20 (assuming i am just getting that the total is $45) There are several add-ons on Zenni's store like UV-protection, Anti-Reflective Coating, etc. I will be going with high index (1.67 or possibly 1.74). I had a bad experience previously with high index giving me a headache (I think it was super high index at 1.74), and the person at the optometrist's office suggested digital lenses to address that issue, specifically the Shamir Autograph III-SV lens. High index lenses are thinner, more powerful lenses. They're lightweight and stylish, but are mostly reserved for those with higher vision correction needs. While most prescriptions are compatible with more than one specific index, it's up to you to decide which one fits your personal needs! High Index 1.74 lenses are the thinnest, flattest, and most cosmetically appealing lens ever developed. These ultra thin lenses are nearly 50% thinner than plastic and 5% thinner than 1.67 high index lenses, offering you the ultimate in technology and cosmetics. The thinner lens is much more flattering, reducing the distortion that high prescriptions cause when made with lower quality lenses. Hi-index 1.74 lenses are perfect for: