Bitumen oil sands extraction

A cross-section of the Cold Lake area deposit shows the depth of the oil sands layer that makes the bitumen in this deposit recoverable only through in situ extraction methods. Source: Courtesy of Alberta Innovates. Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd. begins production. Water Impacts: The extraction of bitumen from oil sands requires a large amount of water, and thus water use is a concern when looking at oil sands extraction. Water used in the oil sands can be recycled, but only small amounts of this water are returned to the natural cycle. Air Quality Impacts: Along with greenhouse gases, other pollutants are released into the air during oil sands operations. It is composed of sand, claw, water, and bitumen, which is an oil that is black and viscous. These sands can be mined, and then processed, to remove the bitumen. Once processed, then bitumen can be then refined into oil. It is a complex process of extraction and separation that is often harvested through strip mining and underground heating.

1 Sep 2016 There are two ways to extract bitumen from the oil sands: either mine the entire deposit and gravity separate the bitumen, or extract the bitumen  24 Mar 2016 Extraction involves the separation of bitumen from sand using water-based gravity separation. Although plant configurations vary across the  19 Feb 2016 In-situ extraction methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (greater than 75 metres underground). 9 Nov 2019 The first efforts to tap the oil sands resource began in the mid 20th century using hot water to separate bitumen from sand. Since then the  9 Nov 2019 Oil sands are a mixture of sand, water and bitumen (oil that is too heavy or thick to flow on its own). Bitumen From Oil Extraction to Consumer.

About eighty percent of oil sands are located deeper than 250 feet below the surface. In this scenario, a process called In situ extraction is well, which sends heat to the bitumen to reduce its viscosity.

Bitumen is extracted from the oil sands deposit by injecting steam deep into the reservoir, allowing the bitumen to heat up and liquify. The emulsion (consisting of bitumen and condensed steam) is then pumped to the surface, and sent to a separation plant, where the water is removed from the bitumen. In the present study, solvent extraction of bitumen from Xinjiang oil sands was investigated using solvents, such as alkanes, toluene, and chloroform, and mixed solvents, such as n-hexane–ethyl acetate and cyclohexane–methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). In the present study, solvent extraction of bitumen from Xinjiang oil sands was investigated using solvents, such as alkanes, toluene, and chloroform, and mixed solvents, such as n-hexane–ethyl In-situ extraction methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (greater than 75 metres underground). Currently, 80% of oil sands reserves are accessible via in-situ techniques. Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) is currently the most widely used in-situ recovery method. A typical oil sands deposits contains about 10% bitumen, 5% water and 85% solids. However, the bitumen content can be as high as 20% in some sections. The solids contained in oil sands deposits are primarily quartz silica sand (usually over 80%), with a small fraction of potassium feldspar and fine clays. Oil sands extraction can affect the land when the bitumen is initially mined, water resources by its requirement for large quantities of water during separation of the oil and sand, and the air due to the release of carbon dioxide and other emissions.

However, non-conventional oils are hard to extract, process and transport. SAGD, each use large volumes of water for extracting bitumen from the oil sands.

Hot water extraction of bitumen from oil sands has been commercially applied for decades. Required caustics and other reagents adversely impact handling and disposal of byproducts of the process. We have developed a new extraction process that accelerates the recovery of bitumen, requiring no intense agitation, caustics, or other chemical additives that aggravate subsequent treatment and disposal issues. Scientists extract hydrogen gas from oil and bitumen, giving potential pollution-free energy by Goldschmidt Conference Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists have developed a large-scale economical Solvent bitumen extraction methods take the steam out of oilsands development. Several waterless extraction methods being piloted that use less energy, produce fewer emissions

Oil sands extraction can affect the land when the bitumen is initially mined, water resources by its requirement for large quantities of water during separation of the oil and sand, and the air due to the release of carbon dioxide and other emissions.

Oil Sands Extraction GSE's patented LIQUEX® technology can be utilized to extract bituminous organic matter from mined oil sands (tar sands). The LIQUEX® process is conducted by mixing oil sands with GSE's proprietary solvent, GSX®. Hot water extraction of bitumen from oil sands has been commercially applied for decades. Required caustics and other reagents adversely impact handling and disposal of byproducts of the process. We have developed a new extraction process that accelerates the recovery of bitumen, requiring no intense agitation, caustics, or other chemical additives that aggravate subsequent treatment and disposal issues. Scientists extract hydrogen gas from oil and bitumen, giving potential pollution-free energy by Goldschmidt Conference Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists have developed a large-scale economical

Oil sands, or tar sands, are an unconventional source of petroleum extracted from an asphalt bitumen sand-like substance. ➔ With the projected expansion of oil.

12 Jan 2017 The Canadian oil sands are one of the world's largest sources of climate with a hydrocarbon called bitumen, tar sands have to be strip-mined from the If all the oil sands were extracted in Alberta, the emissions would be  Oil sands are a mixture of sand, water, clay and a heavy viscous oil called bitumen. There are two means of extracting bitumen depending on the depth at which  19 Aug 2019 Scientists have developed a large-scale economical method to extract hydrogen (H2) from oil sands (natural bitumen) and oil fields. This can  In-situ, Latin for "in position," involves drilling a well to extract bitumen and is often accompanied by a technique called Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage ( SAGD),  31 Mar 2013 Processing equipment at the Kearl Lake Oil Sands mining project in northern Alberta stands ready to begin production. Hundreds of modules 

Bitumen is extracted from the oil sands deposit by injecting steam deep into the reservoir, allowing the bitumen to heat up and liquify. The emulsion (consisting of bitumen and condensed steam) is then pumped to the surface, and sent to a separation plant, where the water is removed from the bitumen. In the present study, solvent extraction of bitumen from Xinjiang oil sands was investigated using solvents, such as alkanes, toluene, and chloroform, and mixed solvents, such as n-hexane–ethyl acetate and cyclohexane–methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). In the present study, solvent extraction of bitumen from Xinjiang oil sands was investigated using solvents, such as alkanes, toluene, and chloroform, and mixed solvents, such as n-hexane–ethyl In-situ extraction methods are used to recover bitumen that lies too deep beneath the surface for mining (greater than 75 metres underground). Currently, 80% of oil sands reserves are accessible via in-situ techniques. Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) is currently the most widely used in-situ recovery method. A typical oil sands deposits contains about 10% bitumen, 5% water and 85% solids. However, the bitumen content can be as high as 20% in some sections. The solids contained in oil sands deposits are primarily quartz silica sand (usually over 80%), with a small fraction of potassium feldspar and fine clays. Oil sands extraction can affect the land when the bitumen is initially mined, water resources by its requirement for large quantities of water during separation of the oil and sand, and the air due to the release of carbon dioxide and other emissions. Extracting bitumen from tar sands—and refining it into products like gasoline—is significantly costlier and more difficult than extracting and refining liquid oil. Common extraction methods include surface mining—where the extraction site is excavated—and “in-situ” mining, where steam is used to liquefy bitumen deep underground.